Document Type: Regular articles

Authors

1 Department of Agricultural Economics and ExtensionDelta State University, Asaba Campus P.M.B 95074 Asaba, Delta State Nigeria

2 Department of Sociology Delta State University Abraka Campus P.M.B 1, Abraka, Delta State, Nigeria

Abstract

This study was conducted in Delta State Nigeria to establish a nexus between rural-urban migration and child labour. Random sampling was applied to select rural settlements and this study covers 450 sample farming households. The results show that rural-urban migration influence child labour (P <0.05). They also show that rural-urban mitigation positively influences child involvement in household farm work and farm wage work (P <0.05). It indicated that rural-urban migration prevents children from consistent attendance to school as it negatively related with schooling of these children (P<10). It is recommended that infrastructural development of rural areas be embarked upon, basic education be made compulsory and parents should be educated on how to schedule the children’s farm work and schooling to avoid conflict; and extension agents should raise awareness of young adults on the benefit of engaging in agricultural practice.

Keywords

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